Tag Archives: raw bread

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 15

raw vegan nut cheese plate

I am very late in writing up the synopsis for the rest of my Advanced Raw Cuisine course, but here it is, better late than never… Day 15!

Day 15 marked the end of pastry week! The finished chocolate bonbons were presented today. We also started prep work for one final pastry recipe that will be completed as part of week 4, and everything came together for the final cheese plate as well. It was beautiful when everything was laid out.

Here are some red pears in the vacuum sealed bag. They are marinading in a sauce that will make them both flavorful and soft. It contains some agave, lemon juice, and spices. The texture was wonderful. The apple slices were pliable and soft, just as if they’d been poached! These are for a chocolate walnut cake that will be ready as part of week 4. 

IMG_2167 IMG_2166

 

These are some candied fennel seed in the making. Fennel seeds tossed with a little maple syrup and put into the dehydrator to get crispy! They will also be used for the walnut cake dessert. 

IMG_2165 IMG_2164

Here are the final nut cheeses after aging in the fridge for over a month! The course is only 4 weeks, but since I was working on a longer 8 week track, I had the opportunity to age mine longer. The texture was wonderful. They were soft and creamy, definitely more “cheese-like”. The flavors were so mature. It was really worth the time to let this happen. I also put some of them into the dehydrator for about 24 hours to put a bit of a “rind” on them. 

cheese IMG_2175 IMG_2174 IMG_2173 IMG_2168

I present to you… the finished cheese plate! This has my nut cheeses, some homemade mustard, a raw bread loaf, some raw crackers, a few slices of cucumber and pear, and a few drops of a balsamic vinegar reduction. It was so good!

IMG_2180 IMG_2179 IMG_2178IMG_2177

 

The last thing that was finished on this day was a batch of chocolate bon bons! We learned how to temper chocolate and made these wonderful filled candies. There is a green tea and honey filling in the center. 

IMG_2154 IMG_2156 IMG_2158

Advanced Raw Cuisine at Matthew Kenney Culinary: Day 1

raw vegan milk chocolate custart

Fundamentals of Raw Cuisine was such a great educational experience for me that I decided to take the second level course, Advanced Raw Cuisine, as well. I’ll be working through it over the months of September and October. 

We really hit the ground running in this class. We jumped right into recipes and some more in-depth culinary techniques. What I really like about this course so far is that the school has gone to great lengths and experimentation to really deliver us some solid and well-tested raw recipes, built on a foundational structure that is similar to a cooked food culinary course. 

Our first lesson was “mother sauces”. Obviously, raw vegan mother sauces are not the same as cooked mother sauces, but the conceptual ideas are there. We were presented with a well-thought out list of 5 raw vegan mother sauces, and during the first week of the course, we are focusing on one of them each day.

The first of the mother sauces that we learned about was the cream sauce. It is built on a foundation of soaked nuts to provide a rich and creamy texture. With these mother sauces, we can add ingredients to modify textures and flavors, which make secondary sauces. Our first recipe assignment was to create a Meyer lemon cream sauce, which will be used in a root vegetable gnocchi recipe on Day 2. I think it looks nice and creamy, don’t you? 🙂

lemon cream sauce

Our second lesson was about nut milks. We covered basic almond milk as a flavor and texture exercise on Day 3 of Fundamentals of Raw Cuisine. It helped us to learn some great lessons about flavor balancing. In this exercise, we were to select 3 different nuts and seeds, and not only compare and contrast the different flavors and textures, but to also consider what kinds of recipes they might be used for, assess how much pulp they created, whether the pulp was usable in recipes, and if so, what kind. It was a really great taste and thought exercise.

I used brazil nut, pumpkin seed, and hemp seed for my 3 selections. The brazil nut was my favorite! Almond milk is so yesterday.

nut milk tasting

 The next recipe was a delicious milk chocolate custard, with the milk being any one of the fresh milks we just created! It’s like someone out there knew how to put me in an even better mood on my first day back to school. =P Seriously, culinary school AND chocolate. I think I’ve reached nirvana.

I chose to use my brazil nut milk, of course. It was amazing. This also has some avocado and spices in it for a little something extra. I’ll definitely be making use of this technique again. 

This recipe is in Matthew Kenney’s book, Raw Chocolate, on page 72. It is listed as “Milk Chocolate Pudding”.

raw vegan milk chocolate custart raw vegan milk chocolate custart

Someone out there must be a mind reader because fermentation is right up there with chocolate on the list of food things I love. We learned how to make salt preserved lemons, which are traditionally used in North African recipes. These have to cure for 3-4 weeks and then we will be using them in a recipe during the final week of classes. I’m really excited about these because it’s something new that I’ve never tried, and I love food from Mediterranean/Middle Eastern regions.

The only part of this recipe that I didn’t like was a little detail of the preparation. We were required to cut an X into each lemon almost down to the bottom and then stuff them with salt. I then realized the eerie resemblance they had to those creepy face hugger eggs in the Alien movies. Thankfully, I’ve had no nightmares about lemons yet. 🙂

salt preserved lemons salt preserved lemons

But, wait… there’s more! I can hardly believe it myself. I feel like there is so much more packed into each day of this course, but at the same time, I am able to work much faster, thanks to the skills I learned in Level 1. While I was sneaking giant spoonfuls of chocolate custard and trying not to think about face huggers, I worked on the next project, which was to start on an olive flat bread recipe that we will be using in a mezze platter on Day 3. If the batter was any indication, this will be divine. Besides having just the right amount of olive flavor, there is a hint of orange zest that balances out the salt nicely.

raw vegan olive flat bread raw vegan olive flat bread

 The final required recipe was to start marinading a batch of eggplant crisps. The sauce was sweet, salty, spicy, and smokey all at the same time. I’ve actually made this recipe before, and I really love it. They’re great to put in a sandwich, break up into a salad, or just to snack on. They don’t even taste like eggplant by the time they’re done, which is great because let’s face it… eggplant on its own is bitter and weird. This recipe makes it all better. 

If you’d like to make this recipe for yourself, it is in the book, Everyday Raw, by Matthew Kenney. 

raw vegan eggplant bacon raw vegan eggplant bacon

 The final assignment was optional… an introduction to kombucha. Anyone who knows me personally has seen all of my crazy kombucha experiments elsewhere on social media. That’s something that can easily have its own blog entry or multiple blog entries devoted to it. So for now, here are a few snapshots of my process and some finished batches. 

making kombucha

making kombucha

making kombucha

Juice Pulp Breakfast Bread (Raw Vegan)

carrot-juice-pulp-bread-raw-vegan

Ever wondered what to do with the juice pulp after you’ve made a beautiful batch of juice? Do you feel bad tossing it in the trash or composting it? Never fear! We can put all that nutritious fiber to good use and make a healthy breakfast flat bread from it! It’s not too sweet either, so you can add a fruit spread or a nut-based cream spread to the top if you’d like. I like to eat it with a nice glass of kombucha. 🙂

Raw vegan fruit, nut, and juice pulp flat bread for breakfast, served with a side of kombucha.

Root vegetable pulp mixed with a little fruit pulp is the perfect combination for this recipe. I used the leftover pulp from my pineapple, yellow beet, and carrot juice. When you make that juice recipe, you can also use this recipe to get the maximum benefit from that pulp and keep from throwing it away!

Pineapple-Carrot-Beet juice and bread made from the pulp.

Juice Pulp Breakfast Bread (Raw Vegan)
A not-too-sweet breakfast flatbread that is made from leftover juice pulp, fruit, and nuts.
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
24 hr
Total Time
24 hr 15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
24 hr
Total Time
24 hr 15 min
Pulp from Juicing
  1. 3 cups chopped pineapple
  2. 8 medium organic carrots
  3. 2 yellow beets
Other Flatbread Ingredients
  1. 1 cup water
  2. 1 cup flaxmeal
  3. 1/2 cup raw liquid sweetener of your choice (date syrup, raw agave, raw honey [honey is not vegan])
  4. 1/2 cup coconut oil
  5. 1 cup chopped pecans
  6. 1 cup chopped dates
  7. 1/4 tsp sea salt
  8. 1 tsp cinnamon (optional, but delicious)
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients together thoroughly in a medium sized mixing bowl.
  2. When well combined, split the "dough" into two portions and spread each portion out onto a dehydrator tray lined with a non-stick sheet. It should be about 1/4" thick.
  3. Dehydrate about 18 hours (at 115 F), then carefully flip the bread over and transfer to a tray without a non-stick sheet for another 6 hours.
  4. It is done when it feels dry to the touch in the middle and can be picked up completely by the edges.
  5. Cut into pieces which are a shape and size that you would find enjoyable to snack on.
Notes
  1. I made my juice with an Omega juicer. Your pulp may be drier or wetter than mine. If you use a centrifugal juicer, your pulp will likely be wetter, and you will need to use less water. The "dough" should be moist and stick together when scooped up. It should not be runny.
  2. If you have a really fancy juicer like a Norwalk that presses every last drop of juice from your fiber, you can try the recipe with more water, but please note, that I have not had experience working with pulp in this state, and cannot guarantee the outcome.
  3. This bread is not very sweet. It reminds me a little of toast. It is perfect for adding your own fruit spread or nut based cream sauce to the top. If you prefer a sweeter bread, you can increase the amount of sweetener that is used. The bread may turn out more soft and chewy and less firm if you do this.
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/