Tag Archives: mushrooms

Zucchini Noodle “Ramen” w/Mushroom Miso Broth – Raw Vegan

raw vegan ramen - zucchini noodles in a mushroom miso broth

The weather was a bit chilly again this evening, but I’ve also been feeling that I wanted a greater amount of raw food today, so I made a flavorful warm raw vegan ramen dish with zucchini noodles and a mushroom miso broth. 

This dish was actually a happy accident. I had marinaded the mushrooms and other vegetables with the intent of using them in sandwiches, but when I tasted the liquid after everything had soaked overnight, it seemed like a very perfect soup base, so I just added the zucchini noodles and some seaweed after gently heating the broth, and everything turned out to be really delicious. The whole dish required very little work, which is my favorite kind of meal. πŸ˜‰

raw zucchini noodles

Zucchini noodles, stacked in the center of the bowl, softened with some sea salt, and ready for the soup.

raw vegan ramen - zucchini noodles in a mushroom miso broth raw vegan ramen - zucchini noodles in a mushroom miso broth raw vegan ramen - zucchini noodles in a mushroom miso broth

Zucchini Noodle Ramen w/Mushroom Miso Broth
Serves 2
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Noodle Ingredients
  1. 2 zucchinis, cut into noodles with a spiral cutter or julienne peeler
  2. few pinches of sea salt
Soup Ingredients
  1. 1.25 cups very warm water (do not exceed 118 degrees)
  2. 1 TB gluten free white miso paste (or another variety of miso if you prefer)
  3. 2 TB tamari or coconut aminos
  4. 1 large portobello mushroom, chopped into 1/2" slices, and then 1/4" pieces
  5. 2-3 TB sun dried tomatoes, julienne sliced
  6. 2-3 TB sweet onion, shaved as thin as possible on a mandolin
  7. Optional: 1 TB seaweed
Instructions
  1. Prepare the broth 12-24 hours in advance. Slice the mushroom, sun dried tomatoes, and onions. Put them in a bowl and set aside. Heat the water (you can use the stove or a kettle and let it cool down to about 110 degrees) and then mix in the miso and tamari. Ensure the miso is completely dissolved into a broth. Pour the warm water over the vegetables and allow it to sit for 20-30 minutes or until room temperature. This helps to soften the vegetables and blend the flavors. Cover this bowl and let it everything marinade in the fridge 12-24 hours.
  2. When you are ready to eat this, spiral cut your zucchinis and sprinkle them with a few pinches of salt. Massage it in and let them sit on the counter to soften and release some of their liquid for about 10 minutes. As the broth has enough salt in it, rinse and drain the noodles when you feel the texture is to your desired consistency.
  3. Strain the liquid broth from the marinaded vegetables and, if a warm soup is desired, while monitoring the temperature (I use an IR thermometer), gently heat the liquid either on the stove top, or in a Vitamix blender until it is warm to the touch, not exceeding 110 degrees (to ensure you don't accidentally go over 118).
  4. Add half of the zucchini noodles to each of two bowls in a "pasta nest" (a twisted noodle tower). Arrange some of the marinaded vegetables around the edges of each bowl. Divide the warm broth and pour over each bowl. Reserve a few pieces of the sun dried tomato for garnish.
  5. If desired, add a bit of your favorite seaweed as well.
Notes
  1. This dish would probably work beautifully with other types of seasonal vegetable noodles in place of the zucchini.
  2. You can also substitute the mushroom variety if you like. I used portobellos because I used some of the marinaded pieces in a sandwich.
  3. You do not have to use white miso. It has a rich flavor that I like and I found a gluten free variety. You can use a different kind of miso if you would like.
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Vegan Chipotle Chili Stew

vegan chipotle chili

Mmmmmmm, chili! We had a little “cold front” here in central Florida recently. It dropped down into the mid-high 40s for about 3 days in a row. It’s practically shorts and flip flops weather again, but we needed something with a little heat to warm us up. My husband hinted that it was great weather for chili, so we took out the crock put and put this fabulously spicy and smoky chipotle chili stew together! 

vegan chipotle chili

I get really excited about cold weather because it gives me excuses to experiment with various vegan chilis and stews. They’re also hearty enough that my husband will happily eat them without missing the meat, so that makes me happy. 

This chili ended up a little runnier than I was hoping because I haven’t used my crockpot in so long. I was a little rusty on which dishes need extra liquid for different cook times, etc. It turned out more like a cross between a chili and a Mexican stew, which was just fine with me! We served it over whole grain brown rice, and it turned out just wonderful! 

vegan chipotle chili

This chili has a variety of beans, bell peppers, mushrooms, and corn. I normally like to add black olives too, but I was so excited about the cold weather and the opportunity to make a batch of chili that I completely forgot. There are a lot of spices in this too for extra flavor: a few spicy peppers along with smoked paprika and chipotle, garlic etc. It has a really rich, smoky, and spicy flavor profile. If you don’t like spicy, feel free to omit the ingredients which are obviously added for extra heat, like the cayenne pepper. My mother would not go near this chili. πŸ˜‰

I also wanted to make a cream sauce to go on top of it, but my husband wasn’t in the mood for sour cream, so I whipped up an onion hemp cream sauce to drizzle over the top. Most of the flavor comes from onion powder. This worked out really well since I did not have enough fresh onion to use in the actual chili. It was a nice flavor compliment to the other vegetables and the smoky flavors in the dish. 

vegan chipotle chili

 

Chipotle Chili Stew w/Onion Hemp Cream
Serves 8
Looking for something warm and smoky to warm you up this winter? This spicy chipotle chili is an easy vegan meal. Served over whole grain rice with an onion hemp cream sauce.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
5 hr
Total Time
5 hr 10 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
5 hr
Total Time
5 hr 10 min
Chili Ingredients
  1. 56 oz crushed tomatoes (2-28 oz cans)
  2. 15 oz each (appx 1 can or make from dried): black, pinto, kidney, and chickpeas
  3. 10 oz fresh or frozen corn
  4. 8-10 oz chopped fresh white button mushrooms
  5. 8-10 oz fresh or frozen chopped bell peppers
  6. 2 TB dried cilantro
  7. 1 TB chili powder
  8. 1 TB cumin
  9. 1 TB chipotle chili (omit if you do not want it spicy)
  10. 1 TB smoked paprika
  11. 1-2 tsp smoked sea salt (to taste - there is no other salt in the recipe)
  12. 1 tsp cayenne pepper (omit if you do not want it spicy)
  13. 1 tsp red pepper flake (omit if you do not want it spicy)
  14. 1 tsp garlic powder
  15. 1-2 cups water (2 for a thinner "stew" and 1/2-1 for a thicker "chili")
Onion Hemp Cream Ingredients
  1. 1/4-1/2 cup water (depending upon desired thickness)
  2. 1/2 cup hemp seed
  3. 1 tsp onion powder
  4. 2 TB nutritional yeast
  5. 1/4 tsp sea salt
  6. juice of 1/2 a lemon (add to taste)
Base Grain Ingredients
  1. whole grain brown rice - 3 cups uncooked
Instructions
  1. Put all chili ingredients in a 6 qt. crockpot and mix until well combined. Set it on high for 4-5 hours or low for 8-9 hours.
  2. Prepare rice as indicated on package before serving. We use a rice cooker, and it takes appx. 45-50 minutes.
  3. Blend all onion cream ingredient in a high speed blender until well combined.
  4. To assemble, place some rice in the bottom of a shallow bowl, spoon chili on top, and drizzle a little onion cream sauce on top. You can also top with some micro greens if you'd like. I really enjoyed the slight textural crunch and fresh flavor that they added.
Notes
  1. All of the ingredients for this recipe were organic. Please look for organic ingredients when possible.
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 3

raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh.

Day 3 of Advanced Raw Cuisine is completed!

This has been a truly wonderful and delicious journey so far. We are not only creating beautiful raw versions of classic recipes like romesco and tabbouleh, but we are also learning the foundations upon which those recipes are built so that we will have the tools to create our own recipes in the future. Every one of these edible works of art is made from pure and uncomplicated ingredients. This is truly how food was meant to be eaten.

Today, we focused on tomato based sauces, demonstrating this technique with a raw vegan romesco sauce. I used a vibrant yellow tomato that I found at my local market to introduce an extra pop of color into the dish. Not unlike a traditional romesco, we used tomatoes, bell pepper, chopped nuts, and spices to build flavor and texture. The finished product was richly flavorful and vibrant, keeping all of the enzymes and vitamin C from the tomatoes and peppers intact that would otherwise be lost to the cooking process. 

raw vegan romesco raw vegan romesco

 The second recipe we learned was a muhammara. Muhammara is dip eaten in the North African and Middle Eastern regions, traditionally made with red peppers, walnuts, bread crumbs, and olive oil. In the raw version, the dip is infused with a concentrated pepper flavor by dehydrating the peppers first. We also soak and dry our nuts to neutralize enzyme inhibitors, which makes them more digestible. Otherwise, it’s not too different from the traditional preparation, except that we use no breadcrumbs. The other ingredients give it so much texture that it’s really not needed. 

raw vegan muhammara raw vegan muhammara

We’ve also created a tabbouleh, replacing the bulgar wheat with hemp seed, and a zucchini hummus, which amazingly, has a very similar texture and flavor to one made with cooked chickpeas. Mine is a little more orange than usual because I’m currently having a secret love affair with smoked paprika. I love the hemp seed in the tabbouleh because it adds a slightly nutty flavor, good fats, and the complete range of essential amino acids. Besides that, it’s easy to come by and requires no preparation, making this version of the recipe even easier to prepare than its traditional counterpart. 

The tabbouleh recipe can be found on page 88 of Matthew Kenney’s book, Everyday Raw. It calls for sprouted quinoa, but it is easily exchanged for hemp seed. 

The eggplant bacon is on page 58 of the same book. Some basic flat bread recipes are on pages 50-52.

The hummus recipe is on page 85 of Everyday Raw Express: Recipes in 30 Minutes or Less.

raw vegan tabbouleh

Besides the muhammara, humus, and tabbouleh, the mezze platter also contains the eggplant bacon and the olive flatbread we created in the days prior. It all came together nicely with complimentary flavors and textures that were a delight to snack on for dinner. My husband ate his fair share too. πŸ˜‰

raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh. raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh. raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh. raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh.

The last plate of the day was mushroom calamari with caper and herb tartar sauce and the romesco that was prepared at the start of the day. We cut calamari shaped rings from mushrooms with ring cutters, and then marinaded them to create a softer, more rubbery, and fattier texture… like calamari, but without harming any sea creatures in the process. After marinading them, we “breaded” them with a blend of flax meal and herbs and then dehydrated until the outside was crispy.

It’s really an ingenious process, and the flavor and texture were very familiar and comforting without having that “greasy” feeling that fried foods leave in your mouth. This is food that leaves you feeling energetic, rather than lethargic, after eating it. There’s also no fear of burning yourself with any dangerous hot oils in during the preparation process. 

raw vegan mushroom calamari raw vegan mushroom calamari raw vegan mushroom calamari raw vegan mushroom calamari raw vegan romesco sauce raw vegan tartar sauce

Before the day was over, we also made two batches of seasoned cashews to add some extra flavor and texture in future recipes. One batch is coriander and the other batch is curry. I just love coriander. It is seriously underrated as a spice. Looking forward to making and eating more delicious things tomorrow!

seasoned nuts - curried cashews

Fundamentals of Raw Cuisine: Day 4

zucchini tartare

On Sunday-Monday of this week, I completed day 4 of β€œFundamentals of Raw Cuisineβ€œ. I probably should have spread it out over 3 days. There was a lot to do, and I only got to about half of it. More than half if it was setting components for other recipes up in the dehydrator. I can’t want to eat the finished products. πŸ™‚

As with every day before, the day’s work started with knife skills. All those pretty cubes of zucchini and the chiffonade cuts of basil went into a beautiful zucchini tartare, and the rest went into the blender for some rosemary croutons. The rest of the veggies were juiced. I’ve been enjoying a fresh juice every day after my chopping exercises!

knife skills knife skills knife skills

After checking on my kale chips (not quite done), I started the day off with a delicious pumpkin pie spice smoothie. This smoothie was a little like a raw “cheesecake” that I made for Thanksgiving last year – it didn’t actually contain any pumpkin. The flavors of carrot and pumpkin pie spices sort of trick your palate into thinking there might be some pumpkin in there though! The recipe presented to us in the course is an adaptation of the “Bunny Spice” smoothie recipe in Matthew Kenney’s book, Raw Food/Real World: 100 Recipes to Get the Glow. The main difference is that the recipe in the class had less carrot juice and used pumpkin pie spice instead of just cinnamon. After looking at the recipe in the book, I think I might have liked to try it with the extra carrot juice though!

pumpkin pie spice smoothie pumpkin pie spice smoothie pumpkin pie spice smoothie

While I drank my smoothie, I worked through the reading material about the usage of superfoods in raw recipe creation, and also a primer on raw vegan sweeteners. Raw honey is occasionally used, which is not vegan, and grade B maple syrup is occasionally used, which is not raw, but both in moderation. Many raw foods are sweet on their own if they contain rip fruits or sweeter vegetables like carrots or peppers, and don’t need much extra, except to function as a bit of a flavor enhancer.

That was where I left off on Sunday. I decided to give myself a little rest after spending all day in the kitchen on Saturday. All work and no play makes Adrienne a dull girl, right? πŸ˜‰

I picked up with Day 4 on Monday when I came home from work. The next assignment was a beautiful and delicious zucchini and avocado tartare. This one was really quick and easy to make, which was a good thing because I was very hungry when I got home. πŸ™‚ The recipe blends delicate soft pieces of zucchini with avocado and a tangy herbal sauce in a ring mold to make a dish that is both light in summer flavors and artistic on the plate. Ring molds really step it up a notch!

The recipe is in Matthew Kenney’s book, Everyday Raw Express: Recipes in 30 Minutes or Less.

zucchini tartare zucchini tartare zucchini tartare

 

After my belly was full, there was some more prep work to get those recipe components into the dehydrator. I currently have in my dehydrator: pine nut “parmesan”, shiitake “anchovies” (mushrooms – pre-dehydration photos below), and rosemary croutons (pre-dehydration photos below), which were made with the almond flour that I created after dehydrating the almond pulp from my nut milk in the previous day’s coursework! There is going to be an amazing raw vegan Caesar salad in my future!

mushroom anchoviesrosemary croutons

I’ve saved the best for last. My kale chips turned out great. The pile got smaller as I photographed them because I couldn’t stop eating them. Life is hard, I know. I made two batches of kale chips: ranch and spicy mango lime. I will add recipes for each of them in separate blog posts since this one has become quite long already. For now, you’ll just have to salivate on your keyboard. Sorry! πŸ˜‰

kale chips kale chips kale chips  

Stir Fry Lettuce Wraps (Vegan, Cooked)

Vegan Stir Fry Lettuce Wraps

I am on the road this week visiting family members without access to my light box and DSLR camera, so please pardon the smartphone photos of my recipes this week. My grandfather passed away and I have been busy trying to ensure that my family is eating healthy meals that follow the heart healthy protocol of a low fat whole foods plant based diet. 

This stir fry lettuce wraps recipe was quick and easy to prepare and worked out to only 1 TB of coconut oil per serving. I’ve been trying to ween myself and everyone else off of oils in general, the exception being flax oil, as it is the only plant based oil that is higher in omega-3 than omega-6 fatty acids. 

I still use coconut oil in moderation as a food. While the omega-6 fatty acids in coconut oil are much lower than in other oils, it is good to keep in mind that coconut oil contains ZERO omega-3 fatty acids, so that technically makes it an inflammatory food, rather than an anti-inflammatory one. I use plenty of it on my skin, though! One good thing about coconut oil is that it doesn’t break down into carcinogenic compounds when cooked because it is an oil with a high smoke point. 

This quick and easy stir fry recipe worked out to only 1TB of coconut oil per serving and it fed 4 adults. Stir fry recipes are an easy way to use up vegetables and they are quick to prepare. Traditionally, the heat exposure is only a few minutes to leave some texture intact for the vegetables. 

This recipe had great reviews from my parents and my husband. It is great for omnivores, as it offers a rich blend of flavors that will not leave them missing the meat.

Stir Fry Lettuce Wraps - Vegan
Serves 4
A quick and healthy vegan stir fry recipe with a rich blend of flavors including coconut, ginger, cinnamon, and anise.
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
30 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
30 min
Wrap Ingredients
  1. 1 head iceberg lettuce
Noodle Ingredients
  1. 8 oz rice noodles
Stir Fry Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup coconut oil
  2. 3-4 cloves minced garlic (I love garlic)
  3. 4 carrots, shredded (or a 10 oz bag as a short cut)
  4. 1 celery heart, chopped
  5. 4 sweet peppers, chopped (or 1 bell pepper)
  6. 1/4 cup liquid aminos, coconut aminos, or tamari
  7. Juice of 1 lemon
  8. 1 large bunch scallions, chopped (appx 8 stalks)
  9. 10 oz white button mushrooms, chopped
  10. 1 TB Chinese 5 spice blend (cinnamon, ginger, anise, star anise, cloves)
  11. 1/2 tsp black pepper
Stir Fry Directions
  1. Add the coconut oil to a large pan or wok at high heat. Add the garlic and crunchy ingredients (carrots, celery, peppers).
  2. Stir for 4-5 minutes until fragrant and slightly soft.
  3. Add the aminos, lemon juice, soft ingredients (scallions and mushrooms), and spices.
  4. Stir for another 4-5 minutes.
Noodle Directions
  1. Prepare the rice noodles according to instructions on the package. Most of them cook in about 5 minutes.
Wrap Directions
  1. Separate the leaves from the head of lettuce.
Assembly Directions
  1. Add noodles and stir fry to lettuce leaves, wrap into a burrito, and enjoy!
Notes
  1. Two thumbs up from meat eating parents and husband!
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Pancit (Raw Vegan)

Raw Vegan Pancit Recipe

I was introduced to pancit only a few months ago. One of my friends posted a photo of a lovely meal her mother in law had prepared, and I immediately had to know more about this fascinating dish I had never heard of. I learned it was a Filipino noodle dish and I was inspired to create a raw vegan version that I could enjoy at home. 

Raw Vegan Pancit Recipe

There are many different pancit recipes, and this particular one was modeled after pancit bihon. In place of the rice noodles, I used zucchini noodles. In place of chicken, I used chopped mushrooms marinaded in vegetable juice to produce a meaty texture with a rich flavor that a vegetable stock would have provided in a cooked recipe. Other than that, for my vegetable mix, I used sliced Napa cabbage (you could also use bok choy, pending availability), carrots, onions, and peppers, which often show up in different versions of the traditional version. Instead of soy sauce (which often contains GMO soy and gluten) or tamari (which is fermented with mold), I used coconut aminos, which are raw, taste less salty, and have a rich fermented flavor. They’re a little different if you’re used to the taste of soy sauce, but still delicious. 

Raw Vegan Pancit Reipce

Raw Vegan Pancit Recipe
Serves 4
A light and healthy raw vegan pancit recipe, inspired by the traditional Filipino pancit bihon dish.
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Prep Time
20 min
Total Time
1 hr 20 min
Prep Time
20 min
Total Time
1 hr 20 min
Vegetable Ingredients
  1. 1 zucchini, sliced into noodles
  2. 1/3 head napa cabbaga, thinly sliced
  3. 2 cups shredded carrots
  4. 1 & 1/2 cups chopped scallions
Vegetable Sauce Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup coconut aminos (I like these: Coconut Secret Raw Organic Vegan Coconut Aminos. You can also find them at Whole Foods.)
  2. 1/4 cup unrefined expeller or cold pressed sesame seed oil (I like this one: Spectrum Naturals Organic Sesame Oil)
  3. 2 TB lemon juice (ACV works in a pinch, but changes the flavor)
  4. 2 TB powdered garlic (PROBIOTIC UPGRADE: use 6 crushed cloves of ACV fermented garlic instead - they have a very mild flavor)
Marinaded Mushrooms Ingredients
  1. 2 cups chopped mushrooms (your choice on the variety - I used button and baby bella mushrooms)
  2. Vegetable Broth Juice (Juice: 1 tomato, 1.5 cups chopped carrot, 1.5 cups chopped celery, 1.5 cups chopped sweet pepper, pinch of sea salt, pinch of black pepper)
Instructions
  1. Cut the zucchini into noodles (I use this tool: Spiralizer Tri-Blade Spiral Vegetable Slicer. You can also use a julienne peeler.)
  2. Chop the vegetables. Make sure there are enough chopped carrots and sweet peppers to put through the juicer for the broth juice.
  3. Put the "Vegetable Ingredients" into a large bowl and set aside.
  4. Juice the Vegetable Broth Juice vegetables and add the pinch of salt and pepper.
  5. Put the chopped mushrooms and the vegetable broth juice into a bowl together and let them marinade for at least an hour (overnight is better).
  6. Add the sauce ingredients to a small bowl and whisk.
  7. Pour the sauce over the Vegetable Ingredients and mix until everything is well coated. Let it marinade until your mushrooms are done (about 45 minutes, but again, I prefer the overnight marinade).
  8. After the marinading is complete, strain the mushrooms out and mix into the vegetables. You are ready to eat it!
Notes
  1. Regarding sesame oil, I have also made this with EVOO and avocado oils and both work well, though the olive oil has a much strong flavor and the avocado oil is neutral tasting for the most part.
  2. You can substitute red, orange, or yellow bell peppers for the sweet peppers if you like.
  3. You can substitute bok choy for the Napa cabbage.
  4. I prefer to marinade the mushrooms and the vegetables overnight for the best flavor. If you are in a hurry, an hour will do. If you want a rich flavor and soft texture, go with the overnight soak.
  5. For this recipe, I have tested both diluted and non-diluted vegetable juices to soak the mushrooms. I prefer the juice to be un-diluted in this case, but you can use any strength that you like the flavor of.
  6. You can drink the vegetable juice after you extract the mushrooms or reuse it for another marinade, depending on what kind of juicer you have. If you have a masticating juicer, it should be "fresh" for about 72 hours.
  7. If you are mold sensitive, soak your mushrooms for 15-20 minutes in a dilute mixture of water and vinegar before chopping them to kill off the mold spores.
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Sesame Ginger Asian Lettuce Wraps (Raw Vegan)

Asian Inspired Raw Vegan Lettuce Wraps

This Asian lettuce wraps recipe is one that I have made before, but not officially documented measurements for or taken good pictures of until now. When there is a good meal sitting in my kitchen, it’s a little like torture waiting until the photographs are taken before I can eat it. Oh, the life of a food blogger… =P

I’ve really been wanting some Asian foods lately, so over the next week, I’ll be posting not just this one, but THREE total Asian-inspired raw vegan recipes, and all of them filling enough to be a main course! Making dishes with some ingredient and flavor overlaps is also a great way to use up leftovers and be efficient with your prep time. I only had to shred my carrots and scallions once and I can still toss extras into a salad for lunch!

Raw Vegan Sesame Ginger Lettuce Wraps

I’ve also been trying to come up with some more recipes for this blog that will make the omnivores and cooked food lovers in your life happy, mostly because I enjoy feeding my husband and it makes me happy when I can sneak an enzyme and vitamin-rich raw vegan meal in front of it him and he says it tastes great. πŸ˜‰

This one has had good reviews both times that I’ve attempted to feed it to my husband, and one of my friends made it as a dish to share with her coworkers, so I feel confident that you will love it too. It you are new to raw foods, it’s not too difficult to make, and you will find the flavors and textures to be familiar, so it would be a great transition meal. It is also very filling, and will not leave you hungry if your body is still adjusting to a plant-based diet. 

These raw vegan Asian inspired lettuce wraps are delicious and filling.

Raw Vegan Sesame Ginger Asian Lettuce Wraps
Serves 4
These Asian inspired raw vegan lettuce wraps contain a textural variety of nutritious vegetables, walnuts for good fats, and of course, leafy greens!
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Prep Time
30 min
Total Time
30 min
Prep Time
30 min
Total Time
30 min
Sauce Ingredients
  1. 3/4 cups water
  2. 1/2 cup coconut aminos (I like these: Coconut Secret Raw Organic Vegan Coconut Aminos. You can also find them at Whole Foods.)
  3. 1/4 cup unrefined expeller or cold pressed sesame seed oil (I like this one: Spectrum Naturals Organic Sesame Oil)
  4. 8 pitted dates
  5. 2 tsp powdered ginger
  6. 2 tsp powdered garlic (PROBIOTIC UPGRADE: use 2 cloves of ACV fermented garlic instead)
  7. 1 TB raw apple cider vinegar (I used the garlic infused ACV from my ferment)
Filling Ingredients
  1. 2.5 cups chopped fresh mushrooms of your choice (I used button mushrooms and baby bellas, but have also used rehydrated shiitake and oyster mushrooms, and it is still great)
  2. 2.5 cups chopped walnuts
  3. 1 cup shredded carrots
  4. 1/2 cup chopped scallions (green onions)
  5. 1/2 cup chopped celery (you won't even miss water chestnuts with the crunch that celery provides)
  6. 1/2 cup chopped sweet pepper
Wrap Ingredients
  1. 12 large romaine or iceberg lettuce leaves leaves
Sauce Directions
  1. Combine sauce ingredients in a high speed blender (such as a Vitamix). This will ensure the dates are thoroughly incorporated and the sauce is smooth.
Filling Directions
  1. Chop vegetables as listed in ingredients section.
  2. Pour sauce over vegetables and mix thoroughly until well-combined.
  3. Marinade for 15 minutes (longer is ok too, but this is a minimum to help soften the ingredients and allow the sauce to soak in).
Assembly Instructions
  1. Spoon the filling/sauce mixture on the romaine or iceberg lettuce.
  2. Pick them up and eat them. πŸ™‚
Notes
  1. This is a very rich and filling recipe. My husband and I only used half of the filling mixture and we had 3 each as our dinner. We were both very satisfied. This recipe will feed 4 people as a meal, or you could turn it into an appetizer for a large crowd.
  2. If you are sensitive to mold spores (I am), but still want to enjoy some mushrooms, you can soak them in a dilute mixture of water and white vinegar for 20-30 minutes and then rinse before you chop them up for the filling.
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/