Tag Archives: dill

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 7

raw vegan apple pear crumble with almond milk gelato

Day 7 of Advanced Raw Cuisine at Matthew Kenney Culinary completed!

I’ve had such a fun time working on everything today with many opportunities to exercise my creativity. I’ve learned so much while taking these courses, not only about flavors and techniques, but also about art. My plating skills have improved dramatically, and as an artist, these playful arrangements translate into more lessons for me than just those with culinary applications. They have made me a better photographer, causing me to reconsider placement of the people and objects in my portraits. 

The day was started by adding some sliced apples and pears into a water bath for a little more practice with the sous vide technique. Following that, we learned about and executed two “amuse bouche” dishes. According to Wikipedia, “amuse bouche” literally means, “mouth amuser”. It is a 1-2 bite sized course that is both intense and playful.

We were given the freedom to create two of our own amuse bouche plates. My selections were inspired by the produce and herbs that I’ve been growing in my garden this summer, and by Florida grown produce in general. I tried to include local components in each dish (some as local as my patio).

The first plate includes some of my favorite flavors. It is small sampling of red and yellow grape tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, and scallions atop a parsley and dill hemp seed pesto, which acts as both a surprise element in the dish, and a punch of flavor. 

Recipe link: Parsley and Dill Hemp Seed Pesto

raw vegan amuse bouche raw vegan amuse bouche

I wanted my second amuse bouche to be plated differently from the first, and I wanted a way to transform a classic non-vegan hors d’oeuvre into a healthful raw vegan version. In this dish, I created my version of “prosciutto and melon” using hami melon (sometimes called “Honey Kiss melon”), marinaded red pepper, and Florida avocados with a basil and ginger cucumber sauce. I was very pleased with the result. 

Recipe link: Bell Pepper ‘Prosciutto’ and Melon

raw vegan melon and prosciutto raw vegan melon and prosciutto

While I was busy snacking on my amuse bouche creations, we learned how to use the dehydrator as a “hot box”, which is very handy for creating a “wilted greens” texture, but leaving them completely raw with all of their precious nutrients and enzymes in tact, as the temperature remains at or below 115. 

The salad we made with this technique was a simple spinach salad tossed with some olive oil and lemon, and included a little bit of our macadamia nut goat cheese, some chopped golden raisins, and some pine nuts. Two thumbs up from the husband on this one! We ate it for dinner. πŸ™‚

raw vegan wilted spinach salad raw vegan wilted spinach salad raw vegan wilted spinach salad

After the salad, it was time for dessert. With all of the components for the apple pear crumble ready to go, all that was needed was to plate it. I had enough to make a few of them, so I plated it 2 different ways to see how it would look. Which one do you like best? πŸ™‚

This dish is comprised of the apples and pears that were in the sous vide earlier today. We were told to cut them with final plating in mind. I made very thin round slices on the mandolin, sans cores. In one plating, I rolled them up; in the other, I left them them flat. They are topped off with the oat crumble that we put in the dehydrator yesterday, along with the almond gelato that we also made yesterday. I got a little more practice making perfectly shaped quenelles. I think I’m getting the hang of it! The whole thing is topped off with a little bit of star anise syrup that we made today and a pinch of star anise for garnish. I love that stuff!

If you’d like to make this yourself at home, Matthew Kenney’s book, Everyday Raw Desserts, from pages 118-129, contains a variety of recipes for crumbles, cobblers, and ice creams that you can mix and match to make any number of similar desserts.

raw vegan apple pear crumble with almond milk gelato raw vegan apple pear crumble with almond milk gelato raw vegan apple pear crumble with almond milk gelato raw vegan apple pear crumble with almond milk gelato raw vegan apple pear crumble with almond milk gelato

We ended the day by starting on an advanced pickling assignment. We are making quick pickles here, so the process includes some vinegar, as well as salt, which helps them to be ready quicker than a traditional salt brine only ferment. The class is only 4 weeks, so this method is understandable. We were allowed to experiment with flavors and ingredients that we thought might go well with our aged cheeses. I love pickling experiments, so I made two different jars – one with fruit and another with vegetables. 

My fruit pickles are: elderberry, lavender, apple, ginger, peeled muscadine grapes, and cinnamon. 

My vegetable pickles are: squash, carrot, shallot, turnip, radish, portobello, chili pepper, peppercorn, dill, and smoked sea salt. 

If after 4-5 days, they turn out well, I’ll share the exact recipes. πŸ™‚

pickled fruit pickled root vegetables

Parsley and Dill Hemp Seed Pesto (Raw Vegan)

raw vegan amuse bouche

It’s no secret that I love pesto, and I love to experiment with different varieties because of all the herbs that I’m growing. I’ve been trying to squeeze in as many uses as I can for them before the weather cools and they are no longer flourishing. This parsley and dill hemp seed pesto was created as part of a class assignment, through Matthew Kenney Culinary, to create two amuse bouche dishes.

The pesto is the base for this particular dish, atop which is stacked some red and yellow grape tomatoes, chopped cucumber, thinly sliced radishes, scallion, a few alfalfa sprouts, and some sprigs of dill. A tiny pinch of salt is sprinkled on top to tenderize and enhance the flavor of the vegetables. Every tiny mouthful allows for a little variation in which vegetables are paired with the pesto. It was really wonderful. I enjoyed both eating it and plating it.

Parsley and Dill Hemp Seed Pesto (Raw Vegan)
A delicious herbal pesto made from parsley, dill, and hemp seed. Parsley is a great source of iron and hemp seed is not only a source of good fats, but also offers a full range of essential amino acids.
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Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup parsley, loosely packed
  2. 1/2 cup dill, loosely packed
  3. 1 clove garlic (bonus: use fermented garlic to add some probiotics)
  4. 2 TB hemp seed
  5. 2 TB cup extra virgin olive oil or flax seed oil
  6. 1 TB nutritional yeast (optional if you feel opposed to eating it, as it is not truly raw)
  7. 1/4 tsp sea salt
  8. few twists of black pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Mix all ingredients in a food processor until herbs are thoroughly and finely chopped. This produces a chunky pesto. If you'd like a smoother pesto, use more olive oil.
Notes
  1. Use 1 tsp dried garlic for a milder garlic flavor.
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 6

raw vegan beet carpaccio

Day 6 of Advanced Raw Cuisine at Matthew Kenney Culinary has been completed! This starts the second week of class where the focus is on “advanced equipment”. We’ll be learning how to use the sous vide technique for raw food, how to infuse a smoky flavor into the food via a smoking gun, and how to use the dehydrator as a hot box. I’m very excited about playing with some new kitchen toys!

To start the day, some prep work was required. I made almond milk and processed the strained out pulp into almond flour. I also made some oat flour by soaking raw oat groats, dehydrating them, grinding the grains, and sifting the flour from the bran. 

Next, it was time to harvest some herbs and season the macadamia goat cheese, which had been fermenting over the last 24 hours. I choose lemon balm, parsley, and dill. The lemon balm added a really nice flavor. It is slightly tangy like lemon, slightly sweet, and slightly bitter. It’s one of my favorite tea herbs. The parsley added an earthy quality to the mix, and the dill gave it a rich and savory quality. I love dill so much. I’d put it in everything if I could. 

fresh garden herbs

The macadamia cheese was shaped into a log by rolling it in parchment paper. It was then rolled in the fresh chopped herbs. It had a very herbal and earthy flavor, complimented by the tanginess and saltiness of the nut cheese itself. 

If you’d like to make the macadamia goat cheese, you can fine the recipe on page 48 of Everyday Raw Express: Recipes in 30 Minutes or Less by Matthew Kenney.

raw vegan macadamia goat cheese raw vegan macadamia goat cheese

Following the cheese flavoring, it was time to experiment with the sous vide technique! I was a little intimidated that our first project was to utilize beets. It’s no secret that I have a love-hate relationship with them. I try to like them, I really do. I know they’re super healthy, but they taste like dirt to me. It’s not my fault though. Science says I’m just overly sensitive to geosmin. I taste it in fresh corn sometimes too. 

Geosmin is an organic compound with a distinct earthy flavor and aroma produced by a type of Actinobacteria, and is responsible for the earthy taste of beets and a contributor to the strong scent (petrichor) that occurs in the air when rain falls after a dry spell of weather or when soil is disturbed.” [Wikipedia]

Another side effect of being a supertaster, I suppose. So there. 

I chose yellow beets for this assignment since they have a milder flavor to me. I also love they are the color of sunshine, and I live in the Sunshine State, after all. I sliced the beets on a mandolin, tossed them in some seasoning, and added some fresh herbs from my garden. They went into a vacuum sealed back, and then into the water bath.

I’m using the Anova Sous Vide Immersion Circulator. It’s pretty awesome. It clips onto any container, so you can use a big stockpot that you might already have and it stores easily since it’s basically just a metal cylinder. It stores easily if you have a small place like I do, and there’s no need to purchase a separate sous vide machine. Best of all, it’s very reasonably priced at less than $200 if you get it through Amazon.

raw vegan sous vide beets raw vegan sous vide beets raw vegan sous vide beets

After this project, we made an oat crumble and put it into the dehydrator and also made an almond gelato, which was put into the freezer to set up. 

Then, it was time for a lesson about agar agar. Agar is a seaweed that has amazing gelling properties. It’s not technically raw, but as a sea vegetable, it is rich in minerals, low in calories, and a good source of fiber. It can be used as a replacement for gelatin, and it can also be re-heated and re-blended if it sets too quickly. It’s a very versatile and it’s benefits outweigh its drawbacks. We used it to make a raw vegan version of tofu, with a base of coconut and cashew. 

It had a really nice flavor and texture. It didn’t have the same weird aftertaste that traditional soy based tofu does, and it is completely soy free. If you’d like to make this recipe, it is on page 66 of Matthew Kenney’s book, Everyday Raw.

raw vegan coconut tofu raw vegan coconut tofu

Finally, it was time to plate the beets with the components that we’d been putting together. This dish contains the sous vide beets, the macadamia goat cheese, the lemon butter I made on day 5 and put in the freezer, some crushed pistachio, and a few microgreens or sprouts. 

If you’d like to make this dish, you can find a similar recipe on page 48 of Everyday Raw Express: Recipes in 30 Minutes or Less by Matthew Kenney.

raw vegan beet carpaccio raw vegan beet carpaccio raw vegan beet carpaccio raw vegan beet carpaccio raw vegan beet carpaccio raw vegan beet carpaccio

What a great and delicious day! I can’t wait to see what we’ll be creating next!

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 5

raw vegan corn and mint ravioli

I just completed day 5 of the Advanced Raw Cuisine course through Matthew Kenney Academy. What a wonderful experience my first week has been so far. We covered different types of sauces extensively every day, putting our lessons into practice with a variety of delicious recipe creations. For many of these recipes, we also learned new techniques for food preparation. 

Today, we learned about a 5th type of sauce used in raw cuisine, the “enhanced sauce”. This group of sauces is quite versatile. They are emulsified and using the basic method, they can be used to create either a light and silky smooth sauce, a butter, or an ice cream. For today’s lesson, we used this technique to create a tangy “tomato fondue”, which was used as a sauce in a raw ravioli dish that we plated later in the day.

raw vegan tomato fondueraw vegan tomato fondue raw vegan tomato fondue

While the sauce was warming and thickening in the dehydrator, we created a second enhanced sauce. We were given the option of creating either an olive oil ice cream or a basil butter. I chose the basil butter because I grow my own basil, and I love being able to make recipes with food that I’ve grown myself. This creation went straight from the blender into the freezer to use at a later time. 

basil

When the tomato fondue came out of the dehydrator, it was time to assemble and plate the rest of the ravioli components. We made the corn and mint pesto, which you can see hiding between the coconut wrapper squares  in some of the photos, and we also tossed a little baby arugula with a little olive oil, pine nuts, salt and pepper to help break up the color and spacing on the plate. I had the coconut wrapper squares that were prepared and cut up for the previous day’s lesson all ready to go! 

Bonus: The mint came from my garden. It’s really rewarding to be able to use my own herbs in these recipes!

This is the final result. The whole dish came together beautifully. I was able to put it together quickly and have it ready for lunch time. The tomato fondue was savory, tangy, and had a buttery, but light consistency. The corn and mint pesto was very slightly sweet and refreshing. The coconut wrappers were infused with a bit of carrot and also offered a subtle sweetness to contrast the tanginess in the sauce. They also contributed a more solid, but still soft texture. The arugula tossed with olive oil and lightly seasoned added just a hint of bitterness and saltiness, which nicely balanced the whole dish, both in flavor and in plating. I was thrilled with how well this turned out.

raw vegan corn and mint ravioli raw vegan corn and mint ravioli raw vegan corn and mint ravioli raw vegan corn and mint ravioli

The final project of the day was to get started on some macadamia nut “goat” cheese, which will be used in some recipes over the next few days (and probably plenty of snacking too). πŸ™‚

raw vegan macadamia nut goat cheese raw vegan macadamia nut goat cheese

 

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 4

green curry kelp noodles

Day 4 of Advanced Raw Cuisine at Matthew Kenney Culinary has been completed!

Today’s creations were very exciting! We revisited the coconut wrapper technique that we learned in Level 1 and used to create the kimchi dumplings. For this variation, we added a little carrot juice to give them a brilliant orange color. They went into the dehydrator and will be used in a recipe tomorrow to create ravioli!

This is a really simple method to create flexible grain free wrappers that can be used in a variety of ways, from wraps to dumplings, to ravioli. Just blend some fresh young coconut, toss in a pinch of salt and whatever vegetable juice you’d like to color/flavor it with, and dehydrate until it holds together, but remains flexible. 

carrot coconut wrappers carrot coconut wrappers

The next project, green curry kelp noodles, was the main focal point of the day, and was used to illustrate today’s sauce lesson: plant based sauces. This is a class of raw vegan sauces that use pureed produce as a base. The green curry sauce we made today incorporated coconut milk and herbs with sweet and spicy notes.

It was plated with kelp noodles that we tenderized with warm water and baking soda. This was nothing short of amazing to me. I’ve tried kelp noodles before, and I could never completely get past the crisp texture and semi-bitter flavor until now. Simply soaking them with a little baking soda softened them up just like rice noodles and made the flavor more neutral, and they are completely raw! In this state, they are easily seasoned by any sauces and flavors that are mixed with them. We marinaded these in some chili oil and lime juice. 

The marinaded kelp noodles are topped up with a variety of vegetable noodles that include zucchini, carrot, and radish. Also in the mix are some marinaded mushrooms, fresh cilantro leaves, and some of those curried nuts we made yesterday

It was an amazingly fresh and vibrant dish, full of flavor and texture. I ate every last drop! πŸ™‚

thai green curry kelp noodles green curry kelp noodles green curry kelp noodles green curry kelp noodles

The final task of the day was to flavor our nut cheeses that we started fermenting on day 2. Below, I have created:

  • caraway and smoked paprika (macadamia nut/ fermented coconut water)
  • honey, cinnamon, cardamom, and fig (brazil and pine nut/ water kefir)
  • parsley, onion, garlic, and turmeric (cashew/ probiotic powder)
  • dill (macadamia nut/ rejuvelac)

I can’t wait to eat these! They have a couple weeks to set up in the fridge though, as this is a lesson in aging nut cheeses. 

raw vegan fermented nut cheese raw vegan fermented nut cheese raw vegan fermented nut cheese raw vegan fermented nut cheese

Fundamentals of Raw Cuisine: Days 19-20

root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls

GRADUATION!!! I finished Fundamentals of Raw Cuisine! My last two days were spent working out the final details of my recipes and practicing my plating. Please enjoy the recipes

fundamentals of raw cuisine completion certificate

For our final, we were to design a 3-course meal and then implement 2 of those courses with complete recipes and plating. It was a wonderful experience and I loved the process of working out prototypes and receiving feedback from the instructors. I chose to execute my starter and my dessert.

Here is the menu that I created for my final project. It was based on my favorite cuisine, which is Indian food. πŸ™‚

First: Cucumber Raita Rolls
Coconut Yogurt, Sweet Pepper Relish, Root Vegetable Salad, Cashew, Mint

Second: Mutter Masala Dosa
Curried Vegetables, Turmeric Mashed Jicama, Walnut

Third: Mango Malai
Cashew Milk, Cardamom, Black Cherry, Pecan

Cucumber Raita Rolls (click for link to recipe)

root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rollsroot vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rollsroot vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls

Mango Malai (click for link to recipe)

mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce

On our last day, we made a wonderful cleansing and refreshing “apple aide” drink with a bit of cayenne pepper. Cheers!

apple aid

Raw Food Level 1: Day 17-18

raw vegan mango lassi panna cotta with black cherry sauce

Raw Food Level 1 is almost complete! Just 2 more days of class to go! Over the course of days 17-18, I worked on a lemon tart as part of the process for learning how to use Irish moss. Irish moss is a seaweed that can be used to thicken puddings, tart fillings, etc. 

Here is a photo of the seaweed soaking in preparation to use it.

irish moss soaking

There were some other essential skills that we learned here too. We made tart crusts that firmed up in the refrigerator, a frozen meringue formed into a quenelle, and some dehydrated citrus slices. It was fun learning how to make the quenelle, a classic French technique. I’ve always wanted to learn how to do that. All my frozen treats will be fancier from now on. I also didn’t know that you could dehydrate and eat citrus slices. I always found the peels to be bitter when blended or juiced, but after painting on a little agave and dehydrating, they are a delicious tart treat!

I shared this tart with my husband and visiting relatives, and they all gave it a big thumbs up.

raw vegan lemon meringue tart raw vegan lemon meringue tart raw vegan lemon meringue tart raw vegan lemon meringue tart raw vegan lemon meringue tart raw vegan lemon meringue tart

Both of the dishes that I’m working on for my final project are of my own creation. We were tasked to come up with a three course menu, and then to execute two of the dishes. I chose the starter and the dessert. 

My starter is a cucumber tzatziki roll. The herbs are on the inside and the cucumber is on the outside! It is topped with a sweet pepper relish and paired with a root vegetable with a cumin vinaigrette. Which of my practice plating arrangements do you like best? 

raw vegan cucumber tzatziki rolls with root vegetable salad raw vegan cucumber tzatziki rolls with root vegetable salad raw vegan cucumber tzatziki rolls with root vegetable saladraw vegan cucumber tzatziki rolls with root vegetable salad

 My dessert is a mango lassi panna cotta infused with with cardamom and dusted with cinnamon. It is paired with a peppery black cherry sauce to create a spice blend reminiscent of chai. The panna cotta is topped off with a pecan tuile. Below are the photos of my practice plating before my big final presentation on day 19!

raw vegan mango lassi panna cotta with black cherry sauce raw vegan mango lassi panna cotta with black cherry sauce raw vegan mango lassi panna cotta with black cherry sauce raw vegan mango lassi panna cotta with black cherry sauce

Carrot and Herb Flax Crackers (Raw Vegan)

carrot and herb flax crackers

This is my first go at flax crackers, and they already have the husband seal of approval! I ask him to try everything I make as a sanity check. Admittedly, I have been eating this way for a long time, and my palate is a bit “greener” than his is, but he said these had a good flavor!

carrot herb flax crackers

I am working on a special project. My parents and my grandmother are coming over next weekend for a raw food extravaganza, otherwise known as “brunch”. πŸ˜‰ I have a fresh seasonal multi-course menu all planned out. I’ve been experimenting with some of the recipes now to ensure they will turn out ok before I actually serve them to my family. These flax crackers are intended to be served as an appetizer along with some sprouted lentil hummus that I’m also working on. 

Anyway, as they have the husband seal of approval, I’m adding the recipe now! They are very easy to make if you have a dehydrator at home. I would also like to note that unlike many flax cracker recipes on the web, this one contains no tamari, nama shoyo, or liquid aminos – it is 100% soy free and does not contain any highly processed or mold harboring ingredients. As there are no nuts added, it is also higher in omega-3 than omega-6 fatty acids.

Carrot and Herb Flax Crackers
An easy to make flavorful flax cracker recipe - they are full of flavor, crunch, and living enzymes! Prepare them in the evening and they will be crunchy by morning!
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
16 hr
Total Time
16 hr 20 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
16 hr
Total Time
16 hr 20 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 cups flax seed
  2. 1 & 1/4 cups water
  3. 5 carrots
  4. 1 TB cumin
  5. 1 tsp dill
  6. 1 tsp smoked sea salt (regular sea salt is fine, but smoked adds another depth of flavor)
  7. 1 tsp garlic powder
  8. 1/2 tsp onion powder
Instructions
  1. Blend all ingredients EXCEPT flax seeds in a high speed blender, like a Vitamix.
  2. In a medium sized bowl, stir the mixture into the flax seeds until well combined.
  3. Split the mixture into two equal parts.
  4. Spread each half of the mixture evenly onto two dehydrator trays lined with non-stick sheets.
  5. Dehydrate overnight at 115 degrees F.
  6. I let mine go for 16 hours because I slept in and they were dry and crunchy, like a good cracker should be.
Notes
  1. I have an Excalibur dehydrator and my trays are 15"x15" - adjust the amounts per tray if yours are smaller.
  2. You could probably get away with less dehydration time. I didn't bother flipping them and removing the non-stick sheets either. It is ok to be lazy with this recipe. πŸ˜‰
  3. You can score them after they start to dehydrate for a few hours if you want. I just break them up into organic shapes. I like the artistic look of them.
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Collard Rolls with Lemon Dill Sauce (Raw Vegan)

Raw vegan collard rolls with a creamy avocado lemon dill sauce

Oh, how I love collard rolls. Heck, I love collard greens in general. They’re one of the best plant-based sources of calcium, they are available for most of the year, they are usually pretty cheap, they have a subtle flavor that works well in green smoothies, and of course, the texture is perfect for wraps and rolls!

Collard rolls with shredded vegetables and a creamy lemon dill sauce.

I missed out on the goodness of collards for way too long. I don’t think I even tried collard greens until maybe 2 years ago. I grew up in Florida, which is technically south of “The South” according to a true Southerner, BUT I still heard rumors of collard greens and how they were served in traditional recipes. Those recipes all sounded very unappetizing to me, so I developed a negative association with collard greens and never bothered to give them a second thought… until I got my husband on the green smoothie bandwagon and he came home with a big bundle of collard greens one day. I thought he was nuts until I tried his smoothie and realized that I had sorely misjudged the mighty collard green.

Shave the collard green stem down to make it more flexible for collard rolls and collard wraps!

When I first started eating more raw foods, I saw a lot of people suggesting the use of collard greens for wraps and tortilla alternatives. I tried it out, and couldn’t seem to figure out how to get them to roll nicely without some kind of ripping and breaking due to the thick stem in the middle. After looking at the leaves for a while and realizing the stem was only thick on one side, I eventually got the bright idea to just shave the stem down so it was relatively flat against the underside of the leaf. Alright, you got me. I figured it out as I was working on THIS recipe. I’ve been doing it wrong for years.

Behold, the more flexible collard green – now even more perfect for collard rolls and wraps! 

IMG_8771

With a little sauce, the wraps hold together nicely too. Notice the edge of the leaf in the above photo is magically holding itself down without the aid of toothpicks or sticky rice! Speaking of the sauce, in the name of using ingredients I already had on hand, I opted for a creamy lemon dill sauce that uses avocado to provide the desired texture and thickness. It’s easy to spread over the greens, and it holds the outer layers of the collard rolls together nicely, even after they’ve already been cut into smaller pieces.

A creamy lemon dill sauce made from whisking avocado, olive oil, and herbs.

Collard Rolls with Lemon Dill Sauce (Raw Vegan)
Serves 2
These collard rolls are a healthier alternative to tortilla based vegetable wraps and rolls. Collard greens are high in calcium, and the vegetables inside provide beta-carotine and vitamin C. The sauce is avocado based, making it a source of good fats and potassium, as well as vitamin C from a tangy infusion of lemon.
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Prep Time
25 min
Total Time
25 min
Prep Time
25 min
Total Time
25 min
Wrap Ingredients
  1. 5 large collard leaves
  2. 2 carrots, julienne sliced
  3. 1 jumbo pickling cucumber, julienne sliced (Pickling cucumbers have a nice firm texture)
  4. 1 Cubanelle sweet pepper
  5. 1 small wedge of sweet onion (How much do you like onions? πŸ˜‰ )
Creamy Lemon Dill Sauce Ingredients
  1. 1 soft ripe avocado
  2. 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  3. Juice of 1 lemon
  4. 1 tsp dried dill
  5. 1 tsp onion powder
  6. 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  7. 1/2 tsp mustard powder
  8. 1/4 tsp fresh ground pepper
  9. 1/4 tsp sea salt (or to taste)
Sauce Directions
  1. Mash the avocado until it is creamy (I use a potato masher).
  2. Whisk in the remaining sauce ingredients until well blended.
Preparing Wrap Ingredients
  1. Use a julienne slicer (or mandolin slicer with julienne blade) to cut carrots and cucumbers into thin strips.
  2. Cut sweet pepper and onion into thin strips with a knife.
  3. Turn each collard leaf over so that the bottom faces up and the fat part of the stem is on top. Carefully shave the stems down so that they are almost flush with the leaves.
Wrap Assembly
  1. Spread a thin layer of sauce over each leaf with a flexible spatula.
  2. Equally distribute the sliced vegetables among the leaves, placing the strips at the bottom of the leaves, where the stems were shaved down.
  3. Roll the collards up! As you roll, keep them somewhat snug.
  4. Slice down the center vein, and then slice in half again so that you get 4 pieces from each rolled leaf.
  5. Eat and enjoy! πŸ™‚
Notes
  1. You can use a sushi mat to roll if you want, but I found it was easier to just use my hands due to the size of the collard greens.
  2. Some of the sauce may push forward as you roll, and that is ok. Just wipe off the excess.
  3. You might have a little sauce left over. If you do, you can dip the rolls in it to intensify the lemon-dill flavor, or save it for dipping vegetables or adding to a salad.
  4. If after slicing, you feel that the end pieces are a little loose, you can unroll a couple turns, tighten them up, and then wrap the ends back up. Sushi is not that forgiving!
  5. Feel free to get creative and swap out the vegetables inside or use some sprouts. Mmm, sprouts!
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Creamy Carrot Soup with Dill (Raw Vegan)

Creamy Carrot and Dill Soup (Raw Vegan)

Down here in sunny Florida, winter is definitely over, and we’ve already had some warmer days in the 80s this year (don’t hate!). As such, I’ve been preparing lighter recipes to cope with the heat. This light and fluffy raw vegan carrot soup recipe will leave you satisfied, but not overwhelmed on a warm day.

Sometimes I wander around my local grocery store’s produce aisle (big shout out to Publix for always having great produce and striving to get more organics into their stores) and farmers markets and let the vegetables that are randomly placed next to each other inspire my recipes, and sometimes I like to select plants that are botanically related, as in the case of this carrot soup recipe, where carrot and dill pair wonderfully together. The rest of the seasonings and ingredients just fall into place nicely after that.

Light and fluffy raw vegan carrot soup with dill

Besides being delicious, carrots are also very beneficial to health. The name “carrot” comes from its primary nutrient, beta-carotine, which is an antioxidant that is important for prevention of cancer and heart disease. Carrots also stimulate and cleanse the liver, and help to lower cholesterol due to their high fiber content. Let’s all celebrate the carrot! πŸ™‚ 

Creamy Carrot and Dill Soup (Raw Vegan)
Serves 2
This light and fluffy raw vegan soup is both nutritious and delicious. It is satisfying without being overwhelming on a warm day. It is also quick to prepare.
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Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Total Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 & 3/4 cups filtered water
  2. 4 medium organic carrots, chopped into 2-3" pieces
  3. 2 pearl onions, peeled
  4. 1 TB fresh dill, packed
  5. 1 clove AVC fermented garlic (substitution: 1 tsp garlic powder)
  6. 1/2 cup raw cashews (soak in water for a few hours for better digestion)
  7. 2 TB sun dried tomatoes
  8. 2 TB coconut aminos
  9. 1/4 tsp sea salt (or to taste)
Instructions
  1. Add all ingredients into a high speed blender (e.g. Vitamix, Blendtec, etc.)
  2. Blend on high speed until all ingredients are thoroughly blended.
  3. Serve and enjoy. πŸ™‚
Notes
  1. My husband prefers his soup a little more watery than I do. If you'd like to thin it out, simply add a little more water.
  2. If you decide to garnish with some extra dill on top, it's very delicious. I ate that bowl of soup in the photograph right after I snapped the picture. πŸ˜‰
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