Tag Archives: cashew

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 9

raw vegan portobello picatta

Advanced Raw Cuisine, Day 9, at Matthew Kenney Culinary is completed!

We got to play with the sous vide machine again today. This thing is so much fun! It makes the texture soft and amazing, just like a cooked food, and all of the moisture is retained, unlike heating in a dehydrator. With precise temperature control, we can keep everything within the range that retains all of the vitamins and minerals, and is therefore still considered “raw”. 

For today’s big project, we put some portobello mushrooms in the sous vide and made a portobello picatta! The dish was served alongside a jicama and cashew mash, topped with a breadcrumb mix of walnut toast, almonds, and fresh herbs, and accented with some smoked herbed olive oil butter and a few leaves of watercress. 

If you’d like to make the components of this dish, the “mashed potatoes” are on page 100 of Everyday Raw, and the “portobello steaks” are on page 102. If you have access to a sous vide, simply prepare the portobellos in a sous vide rather than in the dehydrator, as the book instructs. 

sous vide portobello raw vegan portobello picatta raw vegan portobello picatta raw vegan portobello picatta raw vegan portobello picatta raw vegan portobello picatta

 This was a beautiful and earthy dish. I really enjoyed plating it and seeing all of the elements and textures came together. It has the appearance of “comfort food”, but is elegant at the same time. There is a lot of complexity in the flavor too. The jicama is subtly sweet from the cashew, the mushrooms are savory, the lemon butter is tangy and smoky, and the greens add just a bit of bitterness. 

After enjoying this meal, we prepared some cheese crisps that will be used tomorrow, and then it was time to plate the panna cotta! I chose to pair it with a raspberry sauce, some orange supreme slices, and a cacao cookie crumble which was a variation of the crumble made for the apple/pear sous vide dessert on day 7.

If you’d like to make the panna cotta at home, you can find the recipe on page 73 of Everyday Raw Desserts. To convert it to a white chocolate panna cotta as I did, you can replace the coconut oil with raw cacao butter. 

raw vegan  white chocolate panna cotta raw vegan  white chocolate panna cotta raw vegan  white chocolate panna cotta raw vegan  white chocolate panna cotta

While eating the panna cotta, it was time to review the material for the mid-term quiz on day 10. Big day tomorrow!

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 8

raw vegan vietnamese pho

Day 8 of Advanced Raw Cuisine at Matthew Kenney Culinary is completed! 

The day started by soaking some chondrus crispus, commonly known as the seaweed, Irish moss. This is a seaweed that is a natural source of carrageenan – about 55% by weight. It is also a rich source of minerals. We use it in raw cuisine because of its gelling abilities. It is also about 10% protein! To use it, we soak it in water for 3-4 hours and then blend it with some water to make a gel that can be added to our recipes. 

irish moss soaking

 As this is the week we learned about advanced equipment, today we were introduced to the smoking gun. This is a really neat gadget that allows you to “cold smoke” food and beverages. There is a chamber where you put a small amount of a combustible, usually wood chips, and then you light them until they smolder. The fan in the gun blows the smoke that is produced through the tube and by inserting it into a sealed container, the smoke becomes infused into the foods that are in that container.

For this project, we smoked the raw coconut and cashew tofu that was made yesterday. The smoked was produced so fast that I didn’t have a chance to snap a photo of it in action, but you can see it hovering above the tofu cubes The sealed container is left alone until it’s not longer cloudy from the smoke, and then you know it’s been absorbed. It adds such a rich dimension of flavor to recipes, and it’s fun to play with!

raw vegan smoked tofu raw vegan smoked tofu raw vegan smoked tofu

After smoking the tofu, it was time to assemble the pho dish. We made an intricate broth, with 16 different ingredients, but it was well worth it. It had a very complex and delicious flavor, and it went down so easy. It was both light in texture and very flavorful. We added squash and coconut noodles, some scallions, red pepper, cilantro, the smoked tofu, and a few curried cashews. The whole thing was topped off with some black sesame seeds. 

If you’d like to make this recipe at home, it is on page 92 of Matthew Kenney’s book, Everyday Raw Express: Recipes in 30 Minutes or Less.

raw vegan vietnamese pho raw vegan vietnamese pho raw vegan vietnamese pho raw vegan vietnamese pho raw vegan vietnamese pho

 

After eating this amazing dish, we reviewed and started a panna cotta recipe. There were a few different flavor options available, and I chose the one that used raw cacao butter so that I would have white chocolate panna cotta! Here they are hanging out in a couple different mold shapes about to go into the freezer so I can eat them tomorrow. 🙂

raw vegan white chocolate panna cotta raw vegan white chocolate panna cotta raw vegan white chocolate panna cotta

That concludes day 8! Looking forward to day 9!

 

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 4

green curry kelp noodles

Day 4 of Advanced Raw Cuisine at Matthew Kenney Culinary has been completed!

Today’s creations were very exciting! We revisited the coconut wrapper technique that we learned in Level 1 and used to create the kimchi dumplings. For this variation, we added a little carrot juice to give them a brilliant orange color. They went into the dehydrator and will be used in a recipe tomorrow to create ravioli!

This is a really simple method to create flexible grain free wrappers that can be used in a variety of ways, from wraps to dumplings, to ravioli. Just blend some fresh young coconut, toss in a pinch of salt and whatever vegetable juice you’d like to color/flavor it with, and dehydrate until it holds together, but remains flexible. 

carrot coconut wrappers carrot coconut wrappers

The next project, green curry kelp noodles, was the main focal point of the day, and was used to illustrate today’s sauce lesson: plant based sauces. This is a class of raw vegan sauces that use pureed produce as a base. The green curry sauce we made today incorporated coconut milk and herbs with sweet and spicy notes.

It was plated with kelp noodles that we tenderized with warm water and baking soda. This was nothing short of amazing to me. I’ve tried kelp noodles before, and I could never completely get past the crisp texture and semi-bitter flavor until now. Simply soaking them with a little baking soda softened them up just like rice noodles and made the flavor more neutral, and they are completely raw! In this state, they are easily seasoned by any sauces and flavors that are mixed with them. We marinaded these in some chili oil and lime juice. 

The marinaded kelp noodles are topped up with a variety of vegetable noodles that include zucchini, carrot, and radish. Also in the mix are some marinaded mushrooms, fresh cilantro leaves, and some of those curried nuts we made yesterday

It was an amazingly fresh and vibrant dish, full of flavor and texture. I ate every last drop! 🙂

thai green curry kelp noodles green curry kelp noodles green curry kelp noodles green curry kelp noodles

The final task of the day was to flavor our nut cheeses that we started fermenting on day 2. Below, I have created:

  • caraway and smoked paprika (macadamia nut/ fermented coconut water)
  • honey, cinnamon, cardamom, and fig (brazil and pine nut/ water kefir)
  • parsley, onion, garlic, and turmeric (cashew/ probiotic powder)
  • dill (macadamia nut/ rejuvelac)

I can’t wait to eat these! They have a couple weeks to set up in the fridge though, as this is a lesson in aging nut cheeses. 

raw vegan fermented nut cheese raw vegan fermented nut cheese raw vegan fermented nut cheese raw vegan fermented nut cheese

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 3

raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh.

Day 3 of Advanced Raw Cuisine is completed!

This has been a truly wonderful and delicious journey so far. We are not only creating beautiful raw versions of classic recipes like romesco and tabbouleh, but we are also learning the foundations upon which those recipes are built so that we will have the tools to create our own recipes in the future. Every one of these edible works of art is made from pure and uncomplicated ingredients. This is truly how food was meant to be eaten.

Today, we focused on tomato based sauces, demonstrating this technique with a raw vegan romesco sauce. I used a vibrant yellow tomato that I found at my local market to introduce an extra pop of color into the dish. Not unlike a traditional romesco, we used tomatoes, bell pepper, chopped nuts, and spices to build flavor and texture. The finished product was richly flavorful and vibrant, keeping all of the enzymes and vitamin C from the tomatoes and peppers intact that would otherwise be lost to the cooking process. 

raw vegan romesco raw vegan romesco

 The second recipe we learned was a muhammara. Muhammara is dip eaten in the North African and Middle Eastern regions, traditionally made with red peppers, walnuts, bread crumbs, and olive oil. In the raw version, the dip is infused with a concentrated pepper flavor by dehydrating the peppers first. We also soak and dry our nuts to neutralize enzyme inhibitors, which makes them more digestible. Otherwise, it’s not too different from the traditional preparation, except that we use no breadcrumbs. The other ingredients give it so much texture that it’s really not needed. 

raw vegan muhammara raw vegan muhammara

We’ve also created a tabbouleh, replacing the bulgar wheat with hemp seed, and a zucchini hummus, which amazingly, has a very similar texture and flavor to one made with cooked chickpeas. Mine is a little more orange than usual because I’m currently having a secret love affair with smoked paprika. I love the hemp seed in the tabbouleh because it adds a slightly nutty flavor, good fats, and the complete range of essential amino acids. Besides that, it’s easy to come by and requires no preparation, making this version of the recipe even easier to prepare than its traditional counterpart. 

The tabbouleh recipe can be found on page 88 of Matthew Kenney’s book, Everyday Raw. It calls for sprouted quinoa, but it is easily exchanged for hemp seed. 

The eggplant bacon is on page 58 of the same book. Some basic flat bread recipes are on pages 50-52.

The hummus recipe is on page 85 of Everyday Raw Express: Recipes in 30 Minutes or Less.

raw vegan tabbouleh

Besides the muhammara, humus, and tabbouleh, the mezze platter also contains the eggplant bacon and the olive flatbread we created in the days prior. It all came together nicely with complimentary flavors and textures that were a delight to snack on for dinner. My husband ate his fair share too. 😉

raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh. raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh. raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh. raw vegan mezze platter. eggplant bacon. olive bread. hummus. muhammara. hemp tabbouleh.

The last plate of the day was mushroom calamari with caper and herb tartar sauce and the romesco that was prepared at the start of the day. We cut calamari shaped rings from mushrooms with ring cutters, and then marinaded them to create a softer, more rubbery, and fattier texture… like calamari, but without harming any sea creatures in the process. After marinading them, we “breaded” them with a blend of flax meal and herbs and then dehydrated until the outside was crispy.

It’s really an ingenious process, and the flavor and texture were very familiar and comforting without having that “greasy” feeling that fried foods leave in your mouth. This is food that leaves you feeling energetic, rather than lethargic, after eating it. There’s also no fear of burning yourself with any dangerous hot oils in during the preparation process. 

raw vegan mushroom calamari raw vegan mushroom calamari raw vegan mushroom calamari raw vegan mushroom calamari raw vegan romesco sauce raw vegan tartar sauce

Before the day was over, we also made two batches of seasoned cashews to add some extra flavor and texture in future recipes. One batch is coriander and the other batch is curry. I just love coriander. It is seriously underrated as a spice. Looking forward to making and eating more delicious things tomorrow!

seasoned nuts - curried cashews

Advanced Raw Cuisine: Day 2

raw vegan root vegetable gnocchi

On to day 2 of Advanced Raw Cuisine at Matthew Kenney Culinary! Today’s delectable treats included a raw vegan gnocchi and a vegetable miso soup. Not only was there was ample opportunity to continue honing my skills, every dish provided an opportunity to make culinary art and continue improving my plating skills as well. I have truly enjoyed learning new things each and every day.

The first thing I did today was to do a bit of rearranging in the dehydrator. I checked on the olive bread that I put in yesterday and removed it when I found that it was nice and crispy. In its place, I put in the eggplant that I left to marinade overnight. 

Our first lesson for today was on the second of the five raw mother sauces, the vegetable stock. That’s right! You don’t have to give up that tasty soup or your favorite recipes. We can still make flavorful raw vegetable stocks through juicing, blending, and dehydrating. It doesn’t take any more time than simmering a cooked stock would, and all of the vitamins and enzymes are kept in tact. This is especially important when you consider the heat-sensitive vitamin C and that unlike other primate and mammalian species, humans cannot manufacture their own!

Isn’t this broth beautiful?

raw vegan vegetable stock

 

 

Our next lesson was starting on a root vegetable gnocchi. I really love that we have the creative freedom to customize the flavors and ingredient choices in this class. It allows the recipe creation process to feel a lot more personal when the selected ingredients are close to your heart (and tongue!).

For the gnocchi, we were allowed to select any root vegetable that we wanted. The demo was shown using beets. Indeed, they offer many health benefits and are fantastic liver cleaners. I wanted to use a root vegetable that I hadn’t been able to work with over the duration of these courses yet and picked one of my personal favorites, sweet potato! I’ve really been into the color orange lately too. Beta carotine, FTW!

We were given the option to shape them into fancy French quenelles, or to roll them and use a fork to give them more of a “rustic” look. I chose the latter. I really love the traditional look of gnocchi with the ridges across the middle. After forming our selected shapes, into the dehydrator they went!

raw vegan root vegetable gnocchi raw vegan root vegetable gnocchi

 

While waiting a few hours for the gnocchi, there were plenty of other projects to work on, one of which was more fermented nut cheese! We made a few of these in our Level 1 class, but this time around, we’ll be using our own probiotics and aging them to build some additional character in the flavor and texture. I’m a bit of a mad scientist when it comes to fermenting things, so I had to make sure there were enough batches to experiment with. 😉

I’ve got a “control” batch of cashew with a standard probiotic powder, a brazil/pine nut combo with water kefir, a couple pistachio experiments with kimchi and sauerkraut brines, and some macadamia cheeses with fermented coconut water and rejuvelac. 

raw vegan nut cheesesraw vegan nut cheesesprobiotic fermented food

 

The second recipe we worked on while waiting for the gnocchi to dehydrate a bit more was a “new style miso soup”. This soup was a great opportunity to test out the versatility of the raw vegan vegetable broth. It was a flavorful and creative cross between a vegetable soup and a miso soup. It was also slightly creamy, but retained a lightness to it, which made for a satisfying appetizer. Working on this recipe gave me a lot of creative ideas for just how versatile our second mother sauce really is.

raw vegan vegetable miso soupraw vegan vegetable miso soup raw vegan vegetable miso soup raw vegan vegetable miso soup

At long last, after being taunted with the wonderful smells coming out of my dehydrator (don’t forget, the eggplant bacon is still in there too), something was ready to come out and be eaten. I removed the gnocchi after warming the lemon cream sauce from yesterday’s lesson a bit.

In addition to the cream sauce, we learned how to make gremolata, a parsley and lemon based condiment that adds a refreshing quality to an otherwise rich or heavy dish. The flavors and textures paired very well with the Meyer lemon cream sauce, and the textural contrasts looked beautiful on the plate as well.

The most rewarding part of all this is that the parsley came from my porch garden! Food is so much more rewarding when you’ve grown it yourself.

The whole thing was topped off with some micro-greens. I chose some baby chard here, not only for their mild tangy flavor, but also for the beautiful pop of color that the red stems added to the plating. I was really thrilled with how this all came together. It is by far the most beautiful dish I’ve ever put together, and I learned all of the skills with the help of my wonderful instructors. I am really impressed with the quality of the culinary education I’ve been receiving from an online program!

raw vegan root vegetable gnocchi raw vegan root vegetable gnocchi raw vegan root vegetable gnocchi raw vegan root vegetable gnocchi raw vegan root vegetable gnocchi

 

That wrapped up my second day! Looking forward to tomorrow’s projects! We will be putting a mezze platter together and learning about tomato sauces!

Mango Lassi Panna Cotta

mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce

This mango lassi panna cotta recipe was the second that I executed for my final project. I labeled it as a “frozen mango malai” when I turned it in to be consistent with my Indian inspired theme, and not mix Indian and Italian phrases together, but it really does have the flavor of a mango lassi and the texture of a panna cotta. 😉

The panna cotta uses a bit of cardamom, the sauce has a bit of black pepper, and the whole thing is dusted with a bit of cinnamon to form a somewhat deconstructed chai spice blend. Overall, I was really pleased with the way this came out. 

mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper saucemango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce mango lassi panna cotta with cherry pepper sauce

Mango Lassi Panna Cotta
Serves 3
Mango Lassi Panna Cotta: Cashew Milk, Cardamom, Black Cherry, Pecan
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
4 hr
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
4 hr
Panna Cotta Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup chopped mango
  2. 1/4 cup cashew milk
  3. 2 TB cup soaked cashews
  4. 2 TB cup raw honey
  5. 1 TB Irish moss paste
  6. 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
  7. pinch of cardamom
  8. pinch of salt
Cherry Sauce Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup black cherries, pitted and cut in half (10-11 cherries)
  2. 2 TB lemon juice
  3. 2 TB agave
  4. pinch of salt
  5. 1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper
Panna Cotta Instructions
  1. Blend in a high speed blender until completely smooth and integrated. Set up in the freezer for 4-6 hours until firm enough to remove from the mold cleanly. If freezing longer than this, then remove from the mold first and allow to sit on a plate for 30-60 minutes until it softens to the correct texture again.
Sauce Instructions
  1. Blend thoroughly and strain through fine mesh sieve.
Notes
  1. The panna cotta recipe makes appx. 3 of them, depending on the size of the mold that you are using. If you double the recipe, you can safely get 5 from it.
  2. I recommend dusting the plate with a little cinnamon and some crushed pecans.
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Cucumber Raita Rolls (Raw Vegan)

root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber rolls

Coconut Yogurt, Sweet Pepper Relish, Root Vegetable Salad, Cashew, Mint

These cucumber raita rolls were the starter dish that I created for my final project. This dish was inspired by both Indian raita and Greek tzatziki yogurt dishes. The filling in the rolls is flavored more as a tzatziki. The cumin-infused raita flavor is in the root vegetable salad beneath it, which is a blend of sweet potato, turnip, and jicama. The dish is topped off with a sweet pepper relish and garnished with a few tiny mint leaves. 

root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber raita rolls root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber raita rolls

I was very pleased with the way the flavors and textures of this dish turned out. The noodles were neither too soggy nor too crunchy, the cucumber rolls had a lot of flavor, and their soft texture complimented the subtle al dente texture in the root vegetable salad, while the sweet pepper relish brought in just a bit of sweetness to top the whole thing off. It was a well blended mix of tangy, savory, salt, and sweet. I am really thrilled that the course gave me the means to create something so beautiful and delicious.

root vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber raita rollsroot vegetable salad with tzatziki cucumber raita rolls

Cucumber Raita Rolls
Serves 1
Coconut Yogurt, Sweet Pepper Relish, Root Vegetable Salad, Cashew, Mint. The amounts here serve 1. Feel free to increase the volume to suit the number of servings you'd like to make.
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Root Vegetable Salad Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup each: sweet potato, turnip, jicama, spiral cut
  2. 1 TB grape seed oil
  3. 1 tsp lemon juice
  4. pinch of salt
  5. 1/4 tsp cumin powder
Sweet Pepper Relish Ingredients
  1. 2 TB each red, orange, yellow bell pepper, diced
  2. 1 tsp olive oil
  3. 1 tsp ACV
  4. 1 TB agave
  5. pinch salt
Yogurt Ingredients
  1. 3/4 cup coconut meat
  2. 1/4 cup soaked cashews
  3. 1/8 tsp 30B CFU Probiotic powder
Raita Ingredients
  1. 1 cup peeled and grated English cucumber
  2. 1/4 tsp salt
  3. 1/2 TB shallot, finely chopped
  4. 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  5. 1 tsp olive oil
  6. 1 tsp fresh dill, chopped
  7. 1/4 tsp fresh mint, chopped
  8. pinch of salt
  9. pinch of ground pepper
Cucumber Roll Ingredients
  1. 1 English cucumber, sliced thinly along the length of the fruit, on a mandolin.
Yogurt Directions
  1. Blend yogurt ingredients in a high speed blender until smooth and completely incorporated. Cover with muslin and put in dehydrator for 18 hours at 110 degrees. Put it in a cheesecloth with a weight on it and drain it for 36 hours. It will continue to ferment and thicken, and come out like a Greek yogurt. Put it in the fridge until you are ready to add the raita seasoning. Reduces to appx 1/2 cup + 2 TB.
Raita Directions
  1. Toss peeled and grated cucumber with 1/4 tsp salt. Let sit for 5-10 minutes. Squeeze as much moisture out as possible. Reduces down to about 2 TB. Stir into yogurt along with the rest of the ingredients. Refrigerate until ready to use.
Pepper Relish Directions
  1. Toss all ingredients together. Dehydrate at 115 for 4-5 hours (on a non-stick sheet so nothing falls through) to soften and chill overnight.
Root Vegetable Salad Directions
  1. Toss all ingredients together in a bowl and allow to marinade 10-15 minutes before serving.
Assembly
  1. Layer a small handful of the root vegetable salad on the base of a small sushi plate.
  2. Place roughly 1 TB of the raita mix onto the end of a cucumber slice and roll it up. Place rolls on top of salad.
  3. Top with sweet pepper relish.
Notes
  1. Feel free to make a much larger batch of yogurt, relish, or salad with this recipe. Whatever yogurt you don't use for the raita is excellent to eat for breakfast. Having a raw vegan relish is nice to add to any dish as a condiment!
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/

Fundamentals of Raw Cuisine – Day 2

raw vegan lasagna

I just finished day 2 of “Fundamentals of Raw Cuisine“, a course offered online through the Matthew Kenney Academy. It’s been a great experience so far. It’s very labor intensive and I’m so thankful that I was able to do this as an 8-week course. There is going to be a lot of stuff happening in my kitchen this weekend as I attempt to finish Day 3 on Saturday and Day 4 on Sunday!

To start Day 2, we learned about flavor balancing, and we made some seasoned almonds in the dehydrator that will be used for a recipe later in the week (Day 6), so I’ll post a photo of them at that time. Following that, more knife skills! We do cutting exercises every day to learn better grip and control of both the knife and the food being cut. I’m sure it will save me from many future accidents! I think they are getting a little better, but I still need more practice.

chef knife skills exercise

 

We also learned about plating guidelines and put that into practice with two beautiful raw vegan dishes: red beet ravioli and lasagna. I have learned to much from this course in the mere two days of work that I have completed.

Both recipes can be found in the book, Raw Food/Real World: 100 Recipes to Get the Glow. Highly recommended!

The knife skills and the plating guidelines have helped me tremendously. Plating food really IS an art form. I really feel that these are probably the best food photos I have ever taken, thanks to the new things I have learned and incredibly helpful feedback from the instructors.

I’m definitely looking forward to day 3, because I peeked ahead and I get to make smoothies and pickles! =D

raw vegan red beet ravioli raw vegan red beet ravioli raw vegan red beet ravioli raw vegan lasagna raw vegan lasagna raw vegan lasagna

Stuffed Peppers with Cheesy Cauliflower Rice (Vegan)

Stuffed Sweet Peppers with Cheesy Cauliflower Rice

I had just a few Cubanelle peppers left over from my last trip to the farmer’s market, and I’ve been wanting to try a stuffed peppers recipe for a while, so I made a go of it while my husband was around for taste testing. If he’s not around when I work on my recipes, he sometimes won’t get any. 😉

Sweet peppers stuffed with a cashew nut sauce and cauliflower rice

My first thought in trying to make a version for him and a version for me involved using rice and goat cheese as a filling for his stuffed peppers, but we had a lot of projects planned for the afternoon, so I opted for a more efficient solution. I decided to make a filling that would work well both raw and cooked, so he could have some warmth and softer textures in his version and I wouldn’t have to do as many dishes. 

Stuffed peppers with vegan cheesy sauce and cauliflower rice

I made a vegan cheese-like sauce with a nut base and some nutritional yeast, and I shredded some orange cauliflower to use as a rice substitute. Both versions came out well, but I thought the flavor of the sauce was a bit zestier in the raw version. To my surprise, he actually enjoyed the raw version. Rather than using a fork and knife, as with the cooked version, he just picked it up and ate it as finger food. 🙂

Sweet Peppers Stuffed with Cheesy Cauliflower Rice
A vegan stuffed pepper recipe that is flavorful, low carb, and grain free! You can eat it as a raw vegan meal or bake it for a softer and more warming meal for your guests.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
30 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
20 min
Total Time
30 min
Chopped Vegetable Ingredients
  1. 4 Cubanelle peppers (or other sweet pepper of similar size - appx 4" long)
  2. 8 large florets of cauliflower (I used orange cauliflower, but any color will do)
  3. 1/4 cup chopped sweet onion
Cheese Sauce Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup raw cashews
  2. 1/4 cup pine nuts
  3. 1/2 cup water
  4. Juice of 1/4 lemon
  5. 2 TB extra virgin olive oil
  6. 2 cloves ACV fermented or pickled garlic, minced (substitution: 2 tsp garlic powder)
  7. 3 TB nutritional yeast
  8. 1/4 tsp sea salt
Garnish & Seasoning
  1. Fresh or dried dill
Instructions
  1. Add all sauce ingredients to a high speed blender and mix thoroughly until everything is well blended and the sauce is smooth and creamy.
  2. Cut the sweet peppers into halves, lengthwise.
  3. Finely dice the sweet onion.
  4. Mince the garlic through a garlic press (unless using powdered).
  5. Grate the cauliflower florets with a cheese grater to make fine crumbled rice-sized pieces. Alternatively, use a food processor and it will be faster.
  6. Mix all chopped vegetables (except peppers) with the sauce in a medium sized mixing bowl.
  7. Fill the peppers.
  8. Top with fresh or dried dill. This will add a nice flavor.
  9. If serving raw, eat immediately.
  10. If baking, bake at 350 F for 20-25 minutes, until peppers are soft.
Notes
  1. Depending on the shapes and sizes of your peppers, you may have a little extra filling. It is ok to eat it right out of the bowl with a spoon. 🙂
A Taste of Two Plates http://tasteoftwoplates.com/